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“Life’s a game made for everyone.  And love is the prize”
– Avicci

Love is like a see-saw.

The highs are intoxicating. The lows can be wildly low. And the oscillations in between can give a person vertigo.

When you’ve met someone who stands out, it feels like your whole life led up to them. Years of confusion suddenly make sense. Songs take on new meaning; stars start shining just for you.

But on the flip side, a break-up can feel like a journey to the centre of the Earth. Utter devastation is not uncommon. All the ice cream and Netflix and Tinder-swiping in the world can’t make up for that painful, lonely feeling.

No surprise, then, that those powerful emotions have inspired some of humanity’s greatest achievements. Musically and artistically, there’s probably never been a greater muse… except, perhaps, our inevitable mortality. Although even death doesn’t really stand in the way of love’s inspiration. The Taj Mahal, arguably one of the great Wonders of the World, is a perfect example. The monument was built by an Indian emperor in mourning… as a mausoleum for his dead wife. Furthermore, there’s a whole host of books, poems, operas and films which were created in tribute to a deceased loved one. Truly, love seems to conquer all.

Consequently, the trials and tribulations of courtship are some of the most enduringly relatable struggles in human existence. This is the stuff of a thousand sagas, sonatas, and fairy tales. And yet, how can we distinguish facts from exaggeration. In an aspect of life so monumentally emotional, can we take anyone’s experience as the truth?

Good thing we have scientists and thinkers who’ve spent their lives, dedicated to uncovering the mysteries of romance. While we may never find it easy, at least we can understand a bit.

To all the love doctors: we salute you. Thanks for watching.

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