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How well do you really know your favorite celebrity? Read on to test your knowledge and find out things you never would’ve guessed about Elvis, Bruno Mars, and even Madonna.


42. Who You Gonna Call?

Before he was famous, Bill Murray was arrested at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport on his 20th birthday after joking that he had two bombs in his luggage. While no explosives were found, he was carrying 10 pounds of marijuana. The actor, who later starred in Ghostbusters, avoided jail but spent five years on probation.

Famous People facts

41. Elvis Had a Twin

35 minutes before Elvis Presley was born, his mother gave birth to his stillborn identical twin. Throughout his life, Presley believed his brother was a spiritual guide, referring to him as his “original bodyguard.”

Famous People facts

40. Off-Limits

Model Chrissy Teigen is pretty comfortable in her skin, but there’s one body part she refuses to show in photos: her feet.

Famous People facts

39. Long Lost Siblings?

Ryan Gosling and Justin Timberlake were once basically brothers: as kids, they starred on the Mickey Mouse Show, and Timberlake’s mom was once Gosling’s legal guardian for six months during filming while the Canadian actor (Gosling) lived with the US singer’s family during one season of the show.

Famous People facts

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38. A Bit Fishy

Steve Jobs became a vegan because he believed it would stop him having body odor, reducing his need to shower.

Famous People facts

37. Doing Time

Long before he was an actor, Mark Wahlberg was a rapper. Before that, in 1988, the 16-year-old Wahlberg was in prison after attacking a Vietnamese man in the street. Wahlberg was charged with attempted murder, plead guilty to assault, and served 45 days in prison. Wahlberg’s victim has forgiven Mark, and Mark sought out a pardon for these crimes so that he could work with troubled youth in the Boston area.

Famous People facts

36. Not Just a Pretty Face

Natalie Portman has had papers published in two scientific journals. Her high school paper, “A Simple Method to Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar,” was published in the Journal of Chemical Education, and while at Harvard, she co-authored a study called “Frontal Lobe Activation during Object Permanence: Data from Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.”

Famous People facts

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